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Education

  • Campus Violence And Moral Community

    James R. Vanderwoerd

    While everyone should be concerned by sexual violence at North American universities, writes Professor James R. Vanderwoerd, his newly published research indicates the best answer to toxic masculinity is cultivation of moral communities on campus.

  • Three Back To School Essentials

    Beth Green

    As parents jot down to-do lists for their kids’ return to school, Cardus Director of Education Beth Green sets out her top priorities for educational success.

  • Physically Metaphysical

    Joe Mroz

    What ideology underpins our modern ways of thinking? What impact does that have in human flourishing? Fr. Joe Mroz examines the relationship between the way we think and the philosophy that brought us here.

  • Distinctly Quebec Education

    Beth Green

    Analyzing data from the Cardus Education Survey, program director Beth Green fills Convivium readers in on the “distinct, positive advantages” of religious schools in Quebec. Find the link to the original research in the article. 

  • Schools Bridging Faith and Science

    Beth Green

    Data unearthed by the Cardus Religious Schools Initiative at the University of Notre Dame debunk popular caricatures of religious schools as sinkholes of anti-science obscurantism.

  • What Brent McCamon Said

    Janice Fiamengo, Christina Lamb, Sydney Harker, Aaron Neil

    In late March, Ottawa writer and researcher Brent McCamon wrote sceptically on Convivium.ca about protestors who tried to prevent University of Toronto Professor Jordan Peterson from speaking at the National Gallery of Canada. The activists wanted Peterson “de-platformed” because of his opposition to State-mandated use of transgender positive pronouns.

  • Mea Maxima Masculinity Culpa

    Raymond J. de Souza

    Editor in Chief Father Raymond J. de Souza reflects on the Man Up Against Violence Week occurring at the University of Regina, socialized hypermasculinity, and the true nature of confession. 

  • Wherefore Art Thou Peterson?

    Brent McCamon

    Ottawa based writer Brent McCamon recounts a visit to the National Gallery and reflects on how one evening visit to the art gallery became an opportunity to consider free speech and "the Peterson Phenomenon."

  • Post-Christian Mobs of Yobs

    Raymond J. de Souza

    On the heels of a full week, Editor in Chief Father Raymond J. de Souza reflects on the violence in both London, England and London, Ontario, St. Patrick's Day, and the release of Rod Dreher’s The Benedict Option. 

  • The Canon's Answer

    Hannah Marazzi

    Convivium’s publication of David Goa’s review of “The Slow Professor, Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy” by Maggie Berg and Barbara K.Seeber sparked lively debate among our readers. The most eloquent were from university students engaged in various degree levels and programs of study.

  • The Industry of Ideas

    Peter Stockland

    Publisher Peter Stockland contests the idea that the age in which we dwell is one marked entirely by misinformation and the mediocre. Rather, he points us towards the rich tradition of several publications upon which to delve and enjoy a taste of "the good, the true, and the beautiful." 

  • Checking the Selfish Gene

    Beth Green

    Cardus Program Director of Education Beth Green examines a way to inhibit the transmission of the so-called selfish gene in teenagers. 

  • A Balance of Rights

    Christian Vandergeest

    Supreme Court Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin once wrote that "a multicultural, multireligious society can only work if people of all groups understand and tolerate each other." But when one party's rights start to bump up against another's in that society, what does that understanding and tolerance look like? It's at this point that the question at hand becomes one of balance.

  • Total Victory?

    Naomi Biesheuvel

    Canada’s Supreme Court ruled on Thursday in favour of Montreal’s Loyola High School, finding the Quebec government violated the Jesuit institution's Charter-protected freedom of religion. “It’s a total victory for the school, for parents and for the [education] ministry because it upholds the full society’s value,” said John Zucchi, an appellant in the case and father of a former Loyola student.

  • No steps back, no steps forward

    Peter Stockland

    The Supreme Court of Canada says Montreal's Loyola High School had its Charter religious freedoms violated by the Quebec government's refusal to allow it to teach a program from a Catholic perspective.

  • Nova Scotia and TWU FAQ

    Peter Stockland

    Last year, the Nova Scotia Barrister’s Society said it would not allow graduates of a planned law school at Trinity Western University to practice law in the province unless TWU dropped its community covenant obliging students to refrain from sexual relations outside of a Scriptural understanding of marriage.

  • Competing Stories, Inspired Conversations

    Beth Green

    I’ve been there. I went to both private and state schools. As an educator, I’ve taught in a variety of institutions, both private and public, Christian and secular. As a researcher, I have been wrestling with what the relationship is between these differing settings. Do they have to be in opposition? Or can they learn from one another? I know the struggle to reconcile these seemingly dichotomous streams of education.

  • Pointless Protests

    Janet Epp Buckingham

    I am a big proponent of experiential learning—I run an internship program, after all. But I do have some problems with the Dalhousie course on social activism that has organizing a protest as part of the curriculum.

  • Thinking With Your Hands

    Naomi Biesheuvel

    "It is a kind of progress when you no longer have to mess around with dipsticks and dirty rags," Matthew Crawford stated at the Museum of Nature in Ottawa, Ontario, last month, "but I also want to just notice that there is a kind of moral education that is tacit in material culture ... so I want to speak up for the skilled manual trades, and suggest that's a life worth choosing."

  • Relatable Art and Invitational Work

    Janice Tolkamp

    This summer I had the privilege to admire some very famous works of art in person. Michelangelo's David was definitely one of the more iconic. Turning the corner into the gallery, it was pretty hard to miss the 14-foot, shiny marble human figure, even from a distance: it was big, it was polished, it was impressively executed.

  • No Shame in Dirty Hands

    Doug Sikkema

    There was a certain look students had when they would come to my office a few days into a new semester to confess that they were "dropping down" from University Prep English. Rather than soaring on to academia after their senior year, they were now trundling towards community college or—worse yet, they thought—the workplace.